Na Moolelo Lecture Series Video Archive

June 27, 2018

Dr. Lorenz Gonschor is a senior lecturer and associate dean at ʻAtenisi University in Tonga. His research interests include historical and contemporary governance and politics of Oceania, with a special focus on the International relations of the Hawaiian Kingdom. He explored the origins and development of the last royal order created by Hawaiian monarchs and the policy it symbolized. The discussion, “Kau ka ʻiwa, he lā makani”: A genealogy of the Royal Order of the Star of Oceania,” took place on June 27.

June 13, 2018

Dr. Keanu Sai is a political scientist specializing in international relations and public law, as well as a faculty member at the University of Hawaiʻi-Windward Community College and an adjunct faculty member at the University of Hawaiʻi College of Education. He addressed the concept of “act of war,” as well as its implications and consequences in the context of international law. The discussion, “An Uncomfortable Truth: Hawaiʻi has been in a State of War with the United States since 1893,” took place on June 13.

May 30, 2018

Halena Kapuni-Reynolds is a Ph.D. student and Kanaka Oiwi born and raised on Hawaii Island in the Hawaiian homestead community of Keaukaha. He addressed Indigenous curation, with a focus on the ways that Kanaka Oiwi and local museum professionals marry their professional responsibilities with indigenous sensibilities when caring for alii museum collections. The talk-story, “He Moolelo No Na Mea Waiwai Alii: Caring for Alii Museum Collections,” took place on May 30.

May 23, 2018

Dr. Jonathan Osorio is a scholar, professor and popular composer/singer. He addressed the themes of intimacies and Hawaiian mele, and their significance to understanding our role as Kanaka Maoli—to tend to the aina and to remember who we are as a people. The discussion, “Intimacies: Poetics of a Land Beloved,” took place on May 23. Dr. Lorenz Gonschor is a senior lecturer and associate dean at ʻAtenisi University in Tonga. His research interests include historical and contemporary governance and politics of Oceania, with a special focus on the International relations of the Hawaiian Kingdom. He explored the origins and development of the last royal order created by Hawaiian monarchs and the policy it symbolized. The discussion, “Kau ka ʻiwa, he lā makani”: A genealogy of the Royal Order of the Star of Oceania,” took place on June 27.

April 20, 2018

Dr. Ronald Williams, Jr. of the Hawaii State Archives highlighted how the vast archive of Native Hawaiian language documents are providing new insight to Hawaii’s rich and complex history. The discussion, “Kaulana Na Pua: Claiming Space on the Historical Landscape,” took place on April 22.

April 4, 2018

Noelle Kahanu is an assistant specialist of Public Humanities and Native Hawaiian programs in the American Studies Department of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Noelle took attendees on a personal and professional journey through the museum field, from Bishop Museum to the British Museum, as she addressed the questions: If museum professionals are modern day moo, what are we guarding? Who or what are we protecting? The discussion, “Museums and the Modern Day Moo,” took place on April 4.

The free Nā Moʻolelo Lecture series continues Iolani Palace mission to preserve and share Hawaii’s unique cultural and historical qualities with the community.